Oregon Department of Justice

Crime Victims' Rights Week 2011

Every year, the Oregon Department of Justice Crime Victims' Services Division recognizes National Crime Victims' Rights Week by honoring those who have fought to protect crime victims and give them a voice in the criminal justice system. The theme for 2011 is Reshaping the Future, Honoring the Past which recalls a time in recent history when, among other injustices, victims and their families were excluded from courtroom proceedings and victims of assault were forced to pay for the medical bills and other expenses incurred as a result of the crime.

Two survivors participated in the event by sharing their personal stories about what it means for victims to assert their rights during criminal justice proceedings. See 2011 Commemoration Ceremony program for a list of all participants.

Four Oregonians were recognized at the event for their contributions to victims' services and victims' rights:

Chiquita Rollins

Chiquita Rollins (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson and Attorney General John Kroger
Chiquita Rollins (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson
and Attorney General John Kroger

Dr. Rollins, one of Oregon’s premiere authorities on domestic violence, has 30 years of experience in the field. She was the Multnomah County Domestic Violence Coordinator from 1994 to March of 2011 where she assured staffing of the Family Violence Coordinating Council and administered a $4 million budget. She was the lead policy and planning expert for the County and the City of Portland on the topic of domestic violence intervention and prevention, and had oversight of over $2 million in contracted victim services. Under her leadership, the County received a wide range of grants including one to evaluate the effectiveness of a housing first model for victims of domestic violence, and others for transitional housing, supervised visitation, and the development of the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team (DVERT). Her office also received grants for the Safe Start project which placed domestic violence advocates and parent-child specialists in a local Child Welfare office and a Defending Childhood Initiative to develop a community-wide strategic plan to prevent and respond to children’s exposure to violence. She was involved at the statewide level in policy development, legislation and funding, including as a member of the Oregon Domestic Violence Council and the Attorney General’s Batterer Intervention Standards Advisory Committee. In 2001, she received the Attorney General’s “Outstanding Contribution to Victim Services” Award.

Karen Scheler

Karen Scheler (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson and Attorney General John Kroger
Karen Scheler (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson
and Attorney General John Kroger

 

Karen Scheler moved to Oregon 33 years ago and worked as an elementary school teacher prior to staying at home to raise two children. While working in the family grass seed farm business, she participated in her childrens’ many school activities, served for 17 years on the board of Chamberlin House, a residential housing community for developmentally delayed adults, and was a Court Appointed Special Advocate volunteer for 5 years. Karen became the Executive Director of ABC House in 2003. In her tenure, she has added counseling services, in-house forensic interviewing, a thriving community education program, a development director and increased the numbers of ABC House volunteers. As reflected in these accomplishments, Karen carried out the vision of how a Child Abuse Intervention Center, working with multiple community partners, can impact children’s lives.

Douglas C. Hanson

Doug Hanson (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson and Attorney General John Kroger
Doug Hanson (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson
and Attorney General John Kroger

Doug Hanson, has been a Deputy District Attorney for the Marion County District Attorney’s office for over 12 years and has prosecuted countless domestic violence cases during that time. He meets every case with precise legal analysis yet displays a caring, compassionate and understanding nature with survivors. He has served on the board of “The Hands & Words are Not for Hurting Project” since 1997 and currently is chair. He is an active member of the Salem Police Department’s Domestic Violence Response team and helps train their domestic violence victims’ advocates. Doug is a member of the Attorney General’s Task Force on Victims’ Rights Enforcement and serves as chair of the Noncompliance Response Subcommittee. In that role he helped craft a non-judicial model process for victims’ rights complaints to be heard and remedied.

Lt. Mathew Wagenknecht

Matt Wagenknecht (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson and Attorney General John Kroger
Matt Wagenknecht (center) with CVSD Director Cynthia Stinson
and Attorney General John Kroger

Matt Wagenknecht joined the Portland Police Bureau July 2, 1992 and has been assigned to various positions including patrol, mounted patrol, detective, emergency operations, family services division, and is now in the professional standards unit. Lt. Wagenknecht was promoted to Sergeant in 2000 and Lieutenant in 2007. He serves as a Defensive Tactics Instructor and is a member of the Crisis Intervention Team. His experience has included managing, supervising, and investigating cases of child abuse and neglect and he is a member of the Department of Justice Advisory Council on Child Abuse Assessment. Recently, Matt coordinated the updating of the Bureau’s policies and procedures to ensure that crime victims are notified of their rights, worked with the training subcommittee of the Attorney General’s Task Force on Victims’ Rights Enforcement in the development of a new roll call video for law enforcement officers, and saw that the DOJ Crime Victims’ Rights contact information was included on every Portland Police Bureau’s officer’s business card and the victim/complainant form
which every crime victim receives.

For more information about the rights afforded to crime victims please visit Crime Victims' Rights or the Office for Victims of Crime.